Sunday, October 7, 2018

October's (sparse) Reading Stack



I am going on a strict diet this month.

Unfortunately, I am only adding one new book to my reading stack. I feel so deprived. My new book is On the Way Home, by Laura Ingalls Wilder, which is a reread after all.

For the rest of the month, I will focus on finishing Jude the Obscure, by Mr. Thomas Hardy. I have a confession: Hardy and I have a rocky relationship, but I cannot get enough of his style. Maybe someone can tell me who else to read since I am fond of his writing. Kind of like..."If you like Hardy...you'll love [fill-in-the-blank].

I plan to make bigger dents into David Hume's History of England and A Philosophy of Education, by Charlotte Mason. My kids and I are still reading Macbeth, by Shakespeare, and I started a new book, Jedediah Smith: No Ordinary Mountain Man, by Barton Barbour, with my son. It is a lot longer than I expected. Ugh. But I must finish it.

So if I want to introduce new reading to my diet next month, I must stay the course and finish most of these.

What new books have you started this October???

11 comments:

  1. Wow! If you consider six books sparse reading in a month, you might say mine is non-existent. I'm reading only two this month: The Lair of the White Worm and Dracula's Guest and Other Weird Stories, both by Bram Stoker. I wish you best of luck on getting all six completed; and I have to say that I'm quite envious that you could read that much in one month! What's your secret?

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    1. Well, I'm actually calling it sparse b/c I'm only adding one new book, and I've done a terrible job at getting some of these other ones finished. Several of them are a few months old. : (

      I love adding new books each month, but I've got to make a bigger dent in that history book and the Philosophy of Education before I can add anymore. Hopefully by next month I'll make some room, but I won't be done with the history one for sure. It's so boring!

      I'm ready for some new reads. : )

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  2. Looking forward to your thoughts on Jude the Obscure. I remember practically flying through Far from the Madding Crowd, in spite of not really liking the story... there is definitely something gripping about Hardy's style.

    I just finished re-reading The Jungle Book and need to finish Tom Brown's Guide to Urban/Suburban survival. My next book will probably be a re-read of Lord of the Flies, since I've only read it once and long ago.

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    1. I just read Jungle Book this summer (to my kids)!

      Gripping...yes, that's a good way to put Hardy's style. I love it. But I've got to find a similar author b/c I don't know if I can take much more of his hopeless plots.

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  3. Better to have a few books and get through them than have many and be overwhelmed! I really need to start reading Charlotte Mason. I've seen so many quotes of hers on Instagram lately and they're wonderful! I can't wait to learn more about her teaching philosophy. I wish I'd used more of her philosophy while teaching my daughter. Have much with Macbeth; a great read for October!!

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    1. True, true!!! I like to have at least 4-5 different kinds of books for different reading times and feelings. Since writing this, I ditched the English History by Hume. I am skimming through it and skipping whole parts -- not truly reading. So it's got to go. I rather focus on what I want to read.

      Charlotte Mason is AMAZING philosophy, although she'd probably hate for me to call it that. It's great life stuff and common sense. I wish I read her earlier, too.

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  4. I just read Jude the Obscure. I'm like you. I think he's a powerful writer, but so hopeless. Interestingly, I have read a couple of biographies about him and he embraced the Zeitgeist of his intellectual circle and became "too intelligent" to believe in God and yet they are all so hopeless. Hardy lived to an old age, but a lot of them committed suicide, or wrote or painted about the materialism of man and how it's destroying society. Don't the see a connection between godlessness, materialism and hopelessness?

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    1. Oh, I meant to suggest Wilkie Collins. They were contemporaries and friends. Their writing slightly resembles each other. Collins is perhaps not so dark. George Eliot would also compare.

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    2. Thanks for suggestions. I have not read either Collins or Eliot, but I own some of their works, like The Woman in White, I think it's called and Middlemarch. A friend of mine gave rave reviews for Woman in White.

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    3. Oh, I feel so sad for overly educated individuals who are just too wise for such foolishness as believing in a Creator and the need for a Savior. But God knew there would be Hardy's of the world. Ah, well.

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    4. "Increasing in Knowledge but not in Wisdom."

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