Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Love Less Than Most Readers


Ten Books That Get No Love (or Less Love) From Me

Once again, I'm out of the loop.

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison

Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

The Complete Essays by Michel de Montaigne

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf

North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell

The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

"A Doll's House" by Henrik Ibsen

The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper

I tried, but I can't.

12 comments:

  1. Last of the Mohicans is REALLY dense. I read it as part of a series of American Lit but didn't enjoy it in the least.

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    1. The film version is SO MUCH BETTER!!!!

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    2. Funny how we think alike. I simply do not like Cooper, Steinbeck, Woolf or Ibsen period. I refuse to read any more Morrison. Steinbeck was so self-righteous, but what do you expect of a hard drinking womanizer?

      Heart of Darkness wasn't so bad but I haven't read it in years. I love Henry James, but I gave up on Portrait of a Lady about a third of the way.

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    3. Great minds think alike. : D

      Steinbeck: you can just feel his arrogance bounding off the pages.

      Portrait of a Lady by James was highly effective: I despised it. (But I would actually reread it again, as strange as that may sound.)

      I would read Heart of Darkness again, too, but only bc I do not understand why I disliked it so much.

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  2. Aw...Heart of Darkness is one of my faves, but I understand. It's a "love it or hate it" type of book. ;)

    The Last of the Mohicans - I was so bored by chapter 10, I gave up. But I do want to finish it someday. It sounds good; it's just that that early American style of literature is tough to get into.

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    1. I know - people love Heart of Darkness. I have to reread it one day. But at the time, I was totally perplexed.

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  3. I agree on most of these with the exception of a few that I haven't attempted to read ( North and South; the complete essays of Michael De Montaigne and Heart of Darkness) but I absolutely love The Grapes of Wrath, one of my favorite books along with East of Eden. I do so enjoy your posts!

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    1. I enjoyed North and South the film version much better. And I loved East of Eden, as strange as it was. : )

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  4. I'm definitely with you on the ones from this list which I've read. They were mostly for school or uni. The Grapes of Wrath just went on and on and on. To the Lighthouse - well, the title pretty well says it all. A Doll's House was very sober. And as for Heart of Darkness, I can vaguely remember just one line, 'Oh the horror, the horror!' And that's how I felt when we had to write an essay about it. The Last of the Mohicans, I always thought I wouldn't mind reading for the sake of Daniel Day Lewis, but maybe I won't :)

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    1. Haha! The horror!!! I remember.

      As for Last of the Mohicans - the book is nothing at all like the movie, or hardly. Wow, the movie is so much better. Or maybe it is just Mr. Daniel Day Lewis. : D

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  5. I agree with Heart of Darkness, Song of Solomon, & Mrs. Dalloway, and can understand how Henry James's & Cooper's are hard to love. But Grapes of Wrath has become one of my favorites. Is it because of the queer ending that you dislike it? :D

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    1. There is so much in The Grapes of Wrath that I disagreed with Steinbeck. I argued with him the entire way. You would have to check out my review.

      I disliked how the book was considered religiously represented b/c Steinbeck used religious connotations; yet it was far from true. Even the minister was vulgar and blasphemous.

      Steinbeck's American/Mexican history was incorrect. But that lie has been perpetrated for generations.

      He made American farmers look stupid and ignorant (and no wonder farmers hated this book). Hitler later used the film version as propaganda, saying that if Steinbeck's portrayal of Americans is true, Germany will easily destroy the United States. Anyway, there was probably more, such as Steinbeck's colorful language. It was too much.

      So yeah, those are some of the big ones I remember.

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