Friday, June 8, 2012

Mr. Rochester: an Idol of Worship!


Chapter Twenty-one
When Jane learns that John Reed had committed suicide, and that Mrs. Reed, who is not well, wants to see her, she goes to Gateshead; she gives an account of Eliza and Georgiana, who are no longer affable towards one another.  Her aunt, still full of detestation toward Jane, makes known to her the three-year old letter from Jane’s Uncle John explaining how he would like to adopt her and bestow his fortune on her.  Later, Mrs. Reed dies.

Chapter Twenty-two
Does Mr. Rochester love Jane?  Is he really going to marry Blanche after all?
When Jane reaches Thornfield, Mr. Rochester is surprisingly there to pleasantly receive her, although she had expected him to be away by the time of her return.  Mr. Rochester wants to show Jane his new ride for “Mrs. Rochester,” again seeking her approval; but is this new carriage really for Blanche?  Jane seeks any changes in his behavior, as he is almost to marry, but what of it?  Nothing. 

Chapter Twenty-three
I knew it!
So Jane is pleasantly relishing a beautiful summer evening alone in the garden until she spies Mr. Rochester, who also spies her, and he calls her to himself; he tells her she must go to Ireland immediately, as he has found her new employment following his marriage, which causes her to swell full of emotions which she can no longer control or hide; and maybe Mr. Rochester was testing her because after that exhibition he tells her that Blanche is not for him, she is!  He proposes to Jane, and when she finally recognizes that he is earnest, which is not simple to do, she consents wholeheartedly.

Chapter Twenty-four
Oh, no, Jane!
Jane feels no longer plain, for her love of Mr. Rochester has enhanced her countenance; however, Mrs. Fairfax is reserved over the news of this engagement between the governess and her Master.   Also, Jane considers contacting her uncle in regards to his wishes, in hopes that maybe an inheritance may equalize her to Mr. Rochester in wealth and status, as well as give her an independence from her husband-to-be; Jane claims he has become her whole world and her hope of heaven and even an idol of worship.  Yikes!



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